BKMC welcomes the Women’s Empowerment Program Asia fellows!

In cooperation with the Diplomatic Academy of Vienna, the Ban Ki-moon Centre for Global Citizens hosted a welcome reception for the fellows of the Women’s Empowerment Program Asia on September 30th, 2019.

Co-chair Heinz Fischer welcomed the crowd and introduced the history of Austria as a former President of Austria, and BKMC CEO Monika Froehler and Deputy Director Susanne Keppler-Schlesinger of the Diplomatic Academy also delivered remarks on the first day of the program.

“More than ever does the world need young female leaders like yourself to advocate for a sustainable future with a fresh and innovative mind,” said Co-chair Ban Ki-moon in his video message.

Among the participants were BKMC Board member Ambassador Shin Chae-hyun of the Embassy of South Korea in Vienna, Ambassador Khojesta Fana Ebrahimkhel of the Embassy of Afghanistan in Vienna, and Director Martin Nesirky of the United Nations Information Service.

Watch Ban Ki-moon’s message:

© BKMC / Eugenie Berger

BKMC launches the Women’s Empowerment Program (WEP) Asia!

The Ban Ki-moon Centre for Global Citizens together with the Diplomatic Academy of Vienna officially launched the Women’s Empowerment Program and welcomed the selected fellows from Asia tp Vienna on September 30th, 2019. Total 20 of the outstanding women leaders from Cambodia, Afghanistan, South Korea, and Mongolia were chosen to participate in the tailor-made fellowship training for the upcoming 2 weeks.

At the welcome event, Deputy Director Susanne Keppler-Schlesinger of the Diplomatic Academy said,

“the Austrian Empress Maria Theresia, a great  female leader herself, founded the Diplomatic Academy in 1754. She would be proud to see that today we are launching the Ban Ki-moon Centre’s Women’s Empowerment Program in the very institution that she built.”

The program will offer a unique opportunity to advance young international female global citizens’ potential to promote the Sustainable Development Goals and foster women’s empowerment in their countries of origin by training their communication skills, crisis management and mediation competencies at the Diplomatic Academy of Vienna.

“We received hundreds of impressive applications in the past months. You are the 20 Global Citizen Fellows that we have selected, and it is beautiful to see you gathered here today, already building international friendships and a network of change makers,” said the organizer of the program Viola Christian.

This fellowship training program will offer an environment in which young women can refine their ability to make sustainable change and grow their networks to become the leaders of tomorrow.

“In these two weeks,” said BKMC CEO Monika Froehler to the fellows, “you will further develop your skill-set to make sustainable development happen and to empower women globally.”

The fellows had the time to introduce themselves to each other and share their innovative ideas and initiatives to contribute to the sustainable development in our shared society.

Watch the video update of the WEP Asia on Day 1:

Learn more about WEP Asia: https://bankimooncentre.org/projects/wep

Photos by Eugenie Berger
Video by Angelika Lauber

BKMC and UNESCO APCEIU launch an online course on Global Citizenship and the SDGs

On September 30th, 2019, the Ban Ki-moon Centre for Global Citizens in cooperation with the GCED Online Campus team of UNESCO APCEIU launched the first collaborative online course titled:

“Becoming Global Citizens for a Sustainable Society”

The course introduces the SDGs and the notion of global citizenship through the series of lectures by renowned experts from all over the world, interviews with scholars, advocates and representatives from all different sectors, and case presentations by active global citizens. With the course, the Ban Ki-moon Centre aims to examine and critically reflect on the revolving issues around the globe at local, national, and global levels. By introducing the best practices from different parts of the world, the course also encourages learners to take actions as global citizens to reach sustainable development for all.

Following topics will be discussed throughout the course
ㆍ Global Citizenship and the SDGs (United Nations Sustainable Development Goals)
ㆍ Global Citizenship in a Challenging World
ㆍ Act to Change: Global Citizenship for Transformation
ㆍ Meet the Global Citizens around the World
ㆍ Plan for Action: Becoming Active Global Citizens

👉 Register for the course now to learn how to be a Global Citizen: http://bitly.kr/EctbVMb

Promotional Video 1

Promotional Video 2

 

BKMC CEO Monika Froehler speaks at the UNODC Conference on Education for Justice

On September 27th, the Ban Ki-moon Centre for Global Citizens, Permanent Mission of The State of Qatar to the United Nations, and the UNODC’s Doha Declaration hosted a special event at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, US. Under the theme of “Synergies and Partnerships for Success: An Inclusive and Comprehensive Approach to Promote Education for Justice and Sustainable Development,” the gathered delegation discussed the role of partnerships and empowering children and youth through education.

The maintenance of peaceful and inclusive societies is at the core of Sustainable Development Goal 16 (Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions), a mission to which UNODC has been committed for over two decades, and which entails imparting the fundamental basics of rule of law at every level of society and for children at every stage of their formal education. The latter is the sole purpose of the Education for Justice (E4J) initiative, a component of UNODC’s Global Programme for the Implementation of the Doha Declaration, whose resources on quality education in these and other matters, as defined in Sustainable Development Goal 4, have been helping strengthen young people’s resilience to crime and helping them form a positive sense of identity and belonging.

 

Introducing the session and the panellists, Ambassador Alya Al Thani, Permanent Representative of the State of Qatar to the United Nations, explained that

“the effective prevention of violence and the promotion of justice must look at youth as agents of positive change. If young people are to uphold the rule of law, then education can empower them to do so, especially if they have more knowledge about the complex issues related to crime, justice and violence.”

With the difficulties faced around the world to provide a formal education for many children, the availability and facility of use of E4J’s resources were considered to be a particularly strong factor for all the panellists. As observed by Monika Froehler, CEO of the Ban Ki-moon Centre for Global Citizens,

“teachers worldwide now have resources to draw on to teach the rule of law, thanks to UNODC and Qatar.”

Maria Maras, Associate Professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, fully agreed: “Education for Justice fills a critical need gap in education, by providing open-source materials on key issues.”

 In applying these resources and the values they presented, panellists also made the important point that it was necessary to take a wide-angle lens view of the mission to spread lawfulness; all needed to understand that education concerned everyone, not just educators and students.

“We must empower communities to solve common challenges,” remarked Luis Carrilho, Police Advisor at United Nations Police, “because re-establishing peace and education are mutually reinforcing.”

This need to have a holistic approach was echoed by Alina Peter of the Grumeti Fund, as she stressed that “inclusive decision-making is key to promoting the rule of law, and for our conservation efforts.”

The panel brought together the three important and intertwining topics of education, the rule of law and partnerships, and it also focused on the role of the younger generation in impacting its own future.

“The Doha Declaration is an innovative landmark, recognizing the power of youth to promote the rule of law,” said Major-General Abdullah Al Mal, Advisor to the Prime Minister and Minister of Interior of the State of Qatar. “That is why we are looking forward to continuing our excellent partnership and collaboration with UNODC in implementing the Doha Declaration.”

Concluding with a similarly positive outlook, Marco Teixeira, Senior Programme Officer and Global Programme Coordinator, noted:

“The synergies that we establish today are a fundamental part of E4J’s success in advancing the ambitious goals of our Global Programme. With our valued partners, we are committed to continuing promoting values of lawfulness, and to forming global citizens with a solid moral and ethical compass.”

At the conclusion of the 13th United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice held in Qatar, the Doha Declaration was adopted. Calling for the integration of crime prevention and criminal justice into the wider agenda of the United Nations, and endorsed by the General Assembly, the Doha Declaration has at its centre the understanding that the rule of law and sustainable development are interrelated and mutually reinforcing.

Photos & Source: UNODC

 

Ban Ki-moon’s Speech at the International BAR Association (IBA) Conference

COEX Convention & Exhibition Center 513,

Gangnam-gu, Seoul, South Korea

Sunday 22-27 September 2019

BAN KI-MOON

Opening Ceremony

Welcoming Remarks

 

The Honorable Mayor of Seoul, Park Won Soon,

Chair of IBA Seoul Conference Host Committee, The Hon. Song Sang Hyun,

President of International Bar Association, Horacio Bernardes Neto,

Distinguished Guests, Ladies and Gentlemen,

 

It is my great pleasure to welcome you all to the Opening Ceremony of the 2019 International Bar Association Annual Conference.

 

This is the first time that this huge gathering of esteemed international lawyers has gathered in Seoul. I am simply honored to have been invited to address such an important and influential group hailing from so many continents. I take this opportunity to applaud each of you for making the journey here, whether short or long, and I know some have been of considerable length.

 

Distinguished Guests, Ladies and Gentlemen,

 

Our world is presently in flux. It always is, but in recent times there has been a notable acceleration. Perhaps this is due to the fact that we live in an increasingly interconnected world, where what happens on one part of our planet is immediately known and occasionally felt in another part. Under this backdrop, unfortunately, and in a relatively short period, a shrinking of civil society has occurred and the rule of law of is being eroded.

 

Imagine what the world would look like without the rule of law: No independent media. No freedom to assemble and protest peacefully. No freedom to think individual ideas and articulate an opinion. No independent judiciary and no independent legal profession. Just imagine that for a moment.

 

This erosion is happening, gradually. You are the chief guardians of the rule of law, and, in this regard, must increase your unified efforts to stand firm in halting its erosion. As we all know, the rule of law promotes inclusive economic growth and builds accountable institutions that underpin global sustainable development. It protects individuals and businesses alike.

 

Distinguished Guests, Ladies and Gentlemen,

 

As the 8th Secretary-General of the United Nations, I am fully aware of the IBA’s rich history and its founding principles. Now, I would like to briefly remind you of the establishment of the UN in 1945, the IBA in 1947, and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948. Each were the product of like-minded individuals determined, through passion, compassion, integrity, and a guiding sense of justice to carve out a better world for our future generations. What these key institutions have in common is that they were all developed by diverse representatives with different legal and cultural backgrounds hailing from all regions of the world.

 

As the IBA matches the UN in both structure and ambition, I believe this makes it easier to talk to you because the issues that are important to the UN are also critical to the IBA. From such topics as climate change, poverty eradication, cultural diversity, and the promotion of human rights, mental health, and gender equality; it is clear that there is much work to be done, with new challenges always emerging. However, I firmly believe that each of you will contribute in some way towards what is required in these areas. Indeed, we should be reminded of an old proverb that says, ‘It is better to light a candle than to curse the darkness.’

 

In this respect, the work of the IBA relating to business and human rights, gender equality, and climate change, as well as promoting justice and upholding the principle of accountability are all illuminated candles, and they are lit in alignment with the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

 

In addition, I feel particularly connected to the IBA in other ways too, knowing that Mary Robinson, Chair of The Elders, of which I am a Deputy Chair, and the late Nelson Mandela, Founder of The Elders, both have longstanding links to the substantive work of the IBA. Mary Robinson is working on climate justice and Nelson Mandela was the Founding Honorary President of the International Bar Association’s Human Rights Institute.

 

Before concluding my remarks, I would like to emphasize that an independent legal profession and judiciary are the cornerstone of functioning democracies, and that as much as possible needs to be done to safeguard them.

 

Thanks to your active participation, I am confident that this conference will be crowned with great success. Please allow me to finish by quoting the late Dr Martin Luther King who once said; ‘Injustice anywhere, is a threat to justice everywhere.’

 

Thank you very much for your attention.

BKMC attended the Global Goals Live event hosted by BKMC’s partner Global Citizens

The Ban Ki-moon Centre for Global Citizens attended the Global Goals Live convened by Global Citizens in New York on September 26.

Pharrell Williams, Janelle Monae, Global Citizen Festival Curator Chris Martin, Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg, HER, Cisco Chariman and CEO Chuck Robbins spoke onstage at Global Goal Live.

At the event, a singer-songwriter, H.E.R. said,

“264 million kids are not in school. They don’t have access to education. Making people aware is necessary. Kids are the future. Education is an opportunity.”

According to International advocacy organization Global Citizen, Global Goal Live: The Possible Dream is a year-long campaign to get the world back on track to achieve the Global Goals for Sustainable Development, a roadmap to end extreme poverty, tackle climate change, and reduce inequality by 2030, agreed to by all 193 member states of the United Nations in 2015.

As part of the ambitious campaign, there will be a 10-hour broadcast on Sept. 26, 2020, spanning five continents, with simultaneous events planned for Central Park in New York and Lagos, Nigeria, as well as not-yet-announced cities in Latin America, Europe and Asia.

Source Global Citizen

© Getty Image North America, BKMC

BKMC’s partner RELX hosted a discussion event in New York

“If you want to be successful in your sustainable development efforts, you have to get women’s empowerment right.” – Keith Harper

On September 26 in New York, RELX Government Affairs and Corporate Responsibility in association with BKMC and LexisNexis hosted an event to discuss the role of business in supporting human rights, diversity, inclusion and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

Daniel Marti, Head of Global Government Affairs at RELX, delivered an opening remark, and the conversation was led by BKMC Board Member Marcia Balisciano, Director of the Corporate Responsibility at RELX, and Ambassador Keith Harper, former US Ambassador to the UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, who now serves as Board member of the American Constitution Society.

Co-chair Ban Ki-moon speaks at World Knowledge Forum 2019

“The key to achieving sustainable development goals is embracing.”

Co-chair Ban  made the remarks during the 20th World Knowledge Forum under the theme of ‘Knowledge Revolution 5.0 – Perspicacity Towards Prosperity for All’ on September 26 in Seoul.

At this event, Co-chair Ban Ki-moon said,

 

“In the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), embracing is an important pillar.

The SDGs will not make any progress unless we embrace women, children, the disabled, refugees and other underprivileged people.”

Emphasizing the fact that there is a digital disparity where more than a half of world’s population does not have access to the Internet at this moment, Co-chair Ban said,

“Now, new technological approaches are taking place in an inclusive manner, and the government will have to innovate to achieve SDGs through public investment and research and development,”

The World Knowledge Forum, the one of largest annual business forum in Asia hosted by South Korea’s business media Maekyung Media Group, celebrated its 20th year conference starting from September 25th to September 27th in central Seoul, with a mission to bring unity to the growingly fractured and protectionist world.

More than 250 leaders from political, economic, business and technology sectors are taking part at this year’s forum that will run under the theme of “Perspicacity towards Prosperity for All.”

This year, including Steven Chen, Co-Founder of YouTube, Donald Johnston, the 4th Secretary-General of OECD, and Esko Aho, the 37th PM of Finland, other prominent delegates from WTO, the US State Department, JP Morgan, Samsung, Alibaba, and global universities such as Oxford University, Harvard and Stanford University attended the Forum.

Sources: WKF2019

© MeaKyung Korea

Co-chair Ban Ki-moon spoke at the CEO Roundtable: Delivering Progress for Refugees

As Deputy Chair of the Elders, Co-chair Ban Ki-moon spoke at the CEO Roundtable on the margins of the United Nations General Assembly on September 24th.

This event was convened by president and CEO of the International Rescue Committee (IRC) David Miliband on behalf of the Business Refugee Action Network (BRAN) and moderated by CNN’s chief business correspondent Christine Romans.

“Now, more than ever before, business has a critical role to play in tackling the situation of the most vulnerable. It includes funding programs that provide refugees with opportunities to regain control of their futures, advocating for policies that support refugee access and inclusion, and building markets that create economic opportunities for refugees.” — David Miliband

At this event, business leaders including Richard Branson, Founder of the Virgin Group and Co-Founder of The B Team, and Matthew McCarthy, CEO of Ben & Jerry’s, came together to show their ongoing commitment to improve the lives of refugees and to call on government to include refugees in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Source IRC

© ZIMBO, Ban Ki-moon Centre for Global Citizens

Co-chair Ban Ki-moon attended UN Climate Action Summit 2019 – Adapting Now: Making People Safer

“The eyes of all future generations are upon you, and if you choose to fail us, I say, we will never forgive you.” – Greta Thunberg

On September 23rd, Co-chair Ban Ki-moon attended UN Climate Action Summit 2019 in New York.

UN Climate Action Summit 2019 was convened as global emissions are reaching record levels and show no sign of peaking. The last four years were the four hottest on record, and winter temperatures in the Arctic have risen by 3°C since 1990. Sea levels are rising, coral reefs are dying, and we are starting to see the life-threatening impact of climate change on health, through air pollution, heatwaves and risks to food security.

The impacts of climate change are being felt everywhere and are having very real consequences on people’s lives. Climate change is disrupting national economies, costing us dearly today and even more tomorrow. But there is a growing recognition that affordable, scalable solutions are available now that will enable us all to leapfrog to cleaner, more resilient economies.

The latest analysis shows that if we act now, we can reduce carbon emissions within 12 years and hold the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2°C and even, as asked by the latest science, to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels.

Thankfully, we have the Paris Agreement – a visionary, viable, forward-looking policy framework that sets out exactly what needs to be done to stop climate disruption and reverse its impact. But the agreement itself is meaningless without ambitious action.

UN Secretary-General António Guterres called on all leaders to come to New York on 23 September with concrete, realistic plans to enhance their nationally determined contributions by 2020, in line with reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 45 per cent over the next decade, and to net zero emissions by 2050.

Source / © UN Climate Action Summit 2019